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Judge Approves Apple’s Plan To Pay $500 Million Over iPhone Throttling Lawsuit

Judge Approves Apple's Plan To Pay $500 Million Over iPhone Throttling Lawsuit
Judge Approves Apples Plan To Pay 500 Million Over iPhone

Ioshackz.com Judge Approves Apple’s Plan To Pay $500 Million Over iPhone Throttling Lawsuit Apple agreed in March to pay a $500 million to end a class-action suit over the accusation of it secretly throttling older iPhones, and the settlement plan has now been approved by judge Edward J. Davila of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California.


The lawsuit alleges that changes to the iOS version of the policy led customers to believe that their phones should be phased out and that they needed to change batteries or buy new ones. Apple said that slow down the speed of the iPhones is to prevent a random shutdown of the devices because the peak performance of the devices cannot be maintained after the battery ages,

According to this settlement, Apple needs to pay consumers $25 in compensation for each iPhone. This amount may be adjusted up or down based on the number of iPhones eligible for the case, the minimum total expenditure is $ 310 million.

iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6S, iPhone 6s Plus, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, and iPhone SE users who have formerly and is currently on running iOS 10.2.1 are eligible for compensation.

Court documents indicate that Apple denied having engaged in misconduct and closed this nationwide case to avoid litigation burdens and costs. The company did not respond to requests for comment.

Apple introduced iOS 10.2.1 in 2017 and started constraining the processor’s speed to prevent the battery from shutting down the iPhones all of a sudden, but they did not inform customers of the performance throttling feature.

It was the founder of Primate Labs, John Poole, who observed that the benchmark score was lower than expected, and then spotted it. After discovering that Apple had limited the performance of older iPhones, there was a huge backlash.

In December 2017, Apple formally apologized and promised to make changes. In 2018, Apple cut the cost of replacing the iPhone’s battery. At the same time, it added a Battery Health feature to the iOS Battery settings and provided the user option to disabling the peak performance throttling.